Author Archives: mrkam

Business 8: KitsMall

Imagine that you and your business partners inherited $100,000 from one of your distant relatives. In the will, it states that the money must go towards starting your own business. In trios (or pairs in exceptional cases), generate a couple of business ideas for a retail store across from the school. It should cater to other high-school students (or specific groups of high school students).  Continue reading

Happy New School Year 2017-18!!!

I would like to take this time to welcome you back to a new school year and to welcome you to our course website.

This year, I am extremely excited to teach Business 8, Programming 10-12, and Planning 10 and to learn the names of all the new faces at Kitsilano Secondary! ūüėģ This is my first year at this school but I have over 10 years of classroom teaching experience from¬†John Oliver and Windermere Secondary School, where I have¬†taught business education, computer science, digital media and mathematics. I look forward to get to know all of you better.

In addition, if you¬†are interested in starting a school club or team, come see me.¬†I am a strong believer of building strong student leadership through community involvements and initiatives.¬†In the mean time, please make sure to bookmark and check this website regularly because its contents get updated regularly. ūüôā

– Mr. Kam

Social Media: http://facebook.com/kamsensei

Programming 11/12: Java Homework (Lesson 6 to 10)

The portfolio will be submitted onto Google Drive.¬†You may use content from your portfolio on your 1-page ‚Äúcheat sheet‚ÄĚ that you take to your test. The cheat sheet has to be printed out on paper.¬†

Part 1: Vocabulary and Key Ideas (5 marks)

  1. Summarize the key ideas for each lesson using point form. Approximately 2 to 5 key ideas for each lesson. This may include definitions and/or examples that you might find useful.

Part 2: Exercise Problems (15 marks)

  1. Select five problems from the Exercises or Projects that you have made an error or found challenging. Five in total, not five from each lesson.
  2. Copy the question and provide your original solution.  If you have difficulties starting the problem, get a hint from a peer or from the teacher.
  3. State what your mistake was in a line or two. If you made no mistakes, explain why it was challenging and then provide a detailed solution
    • If you made no mistakes, explain why it was challenging and then provide a detailed solution.
    • If it was a logic error, state what you were thinking and what you needed to think to answer the problem correctly.
    • If it was a syntax, point out where the mistake was made.¬†In either case, be specific and state what your answer should have been to receive full credit.

Part 3: Peer Problem (5 marks)

  1. Create a problem drawn from something you were asked to learn in this unit. You should make the problem challenging but not absurdly difficult. The peer problem should have some depth and be a multiple-points question (i.e. non-trivial).
  2. Provide a detailed solution to your own problem. A solution is not merely the answer but rather an explanation leading to the answer.
  3. Ask a peer to solve it. If the person is struggling, offer hints or clues to help. When the problem is solved, give the response a letter grade and provide written feedback.

Part 4: Reflection (3 marks)

  • Summarize your most common ‚Äėerror types‚Äô and your strategies for correcting them, i.e. what should you look for so that you would not consistently make the same mistakes?

Miscellaneous: Communication (2 marks)

  1. Check for spelling and grammatical errors.
  2. Format the layout so that it is consistent and easy to read.

Programming 11/12: Java Homework (Lesson 1 to 5)

The Java unit will primarily be assessed through portfolios and tests. The purpose of this homework portfolio is to reflect your learning process of the Java programming language through self-inquiry and practice. It is important to note that reflections are not merely a mirror in which you summarize the content of each lesson, but rather a lens in which you deeply gauge your understanding, break down your thought process and connect ideas to create personal meaning. The portfolio will be submitted onto Google Drive.

Note: You may use content from your portfolio on your 1-page “cheat sheet” that you take to your test. The cheat sheet has to be printed out on paper.¬† Continue reading

Programming 12: Merge Sort Algorithm

The merge sort algorithm is one of the fastest algorithms that exists for sorting arrays. Consider the following algorithm and example for sorting the array that contains (3, 4, 1, 5, 2, 7, 6}. Despite its complicated algorithm, merge sort is the fastest algorithm at O(n log2n) compared to selection, insertion and bubble sorts at O(n2).

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Programming 11/12: Sorting Algorithm (Video Assignment)

For this assignment, you will create a short video that demonstrates how one of the sorting algorithm works using a regular set of playing cards. In the video, you must (1) identify which sorting algorithm that you have chosen, (2) explain what the purpose is and how the algorithm works (in subtitles), (3) implement the algorithm on some randomly-shuffled cards, and (4) count the number of steps to sort the cards. To improve your communication with your audience, you may want to explain what is going on step by step. Continue reading

Programming 12: Sic-Bo (ť™įŚĮ∂)

Simplified Rules of Sic-Bo:

  • Player enters the table with money in his/her wallet.
    • Player can bet any whole-number amount he/she¬†chooses less than or equal to the amount they have in their wallet. (Minimum $1)
    • Player places a bet on either BIG¬†or SMALL¬†based on the sum of three dice.
      • SMALL: 4 to 10
      • BIG: 11 to 17.
  • Dealer randomly rolls three dice (each dice is numbered 1 to 6) after bet is placed.
    • Dealer wins if the player misplaces the bet OR if the dealer rolls a triple (e.g. 1-1-1, 2-2-2, etc.).¬†For example,¬†if the player bets $5 and loses, then the player loses¬†$5 from his wallet.
    • Player wins a 2:1 payout¬†if he/she guesses correctly. For example,¬†if the player bets $5 and wins, then the player gains $5 from his wallet.
  • Game is over when either player cashes out or has no more money.

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IT 10: Scratch Assignment 3 – Platformer

The current game allows the cat the move left and right, jump when it’s on a platform, and drop when nothing is underneath it.

Task: Modify the game with the following things:

  1. Include an intro screen with three stages and winning screen. The intro screen should transition into the first stage after 2-5 seconds or after start button is pressed.
  2. At each stage, there is a flag. If the cat touches the flag, it advances to the next stage. The cat advances to winning screen after it touches third-stage flag.
  3. The cat start each stage at a fixed position.
  4. Include at least one of the following: (1) lava, (2) spikes, or (3) enemy — with a natural consequence.

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